28 Days of Royalty: W.E.B. Du Bois

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, known simply as W.E.B. Du Bois, was born in Massachusetts on February 23, 1868. He was an intelligent man who stood for equal rights and the advancement of blacks. Coming from a predominately white town and schooling where he was nurtured, received support, and identified himself as a “mullatto”, Du Bois moved to Nashville Tennesse in 1885 to attend Fisk University. If he had ever wondered what it was like to be hated for the mere color of your skin – living in Tennesse provided him with that experience. “For the first time he began analyzing the deep troubles of American racism,” (biography.com).

Du Bois began to focus his attention on the advancement of blacks – through his accomplishments and efforts, his popularity rose significantly over the years.

  • Du Bois became the first African-American to earn a PhD from Harvard University in 1895
  • Du Bois became the first publisher of an African American case study in 1899 with the study The Philadelphia Negro: A Social Study** This study was the first significant piece that began his writing career. ** The talented tenth phrase was introduced in this study – which is “a term that described the likelihood of one in ten black men becoming leaders of their race,” (bio.com).
  • Du Bois nationally became known after publicly expressing ill thoughts toward Booker T. Washington’s Atlanta Exposition Speech, or as Du Bois called it, the “Atlanta Compromise”. **Washington believed that in order for blacks to advance, they must focus on getting a vocational education as to help them in the workforce which would then enable them to provide for their family. So he urged blacks to not work towards political goals-leave politics to white people, just as long as the blacks were given opportunities to work and a due process in court – separate but equal was A-ok. Du Bois strongly disagreed; he felt this was yet another method that would keep blacks inferior and dependent (much like sharecropping). He advocated equality, so whatever it was whites did, blacks should have the right to strive for, under the 14th amendment.
  • Author of The Souls of Black Folk
  • He was a known supporter of women’s rights
  • Du Bois co founded NAACP in 1909 and had a big role in the making of the organization’s magazine, The Crisis
  • Later, Du Bois moved to Africa where he also helped in the advancement of African colonies by aiding in their freedom from European rule
  • Du Bois died at the age of 95, on August 27, 1963, one day shy of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech
W.E.B. Du Bois February 23, 1868 - August 27, 1963

W.E.B. Du Bois
February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.”

“A classic is a book that doesn’t have to be written again.”

– W.E.B. Du Bois

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Work Cited

http://www.biography.com/

28 Days of Royalty: Thurgood Marshall

What comes to mind when we think of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall?

Intelligent. Powerful. Activist. Strong. Fighter. Winner.

Born July 2nd, 1908 in Baltimore, Maryland, Thurgood Marshall was the great-grandson of slaves. He was a smart young man growing up with goals to go to college then become a dentist. During high school he would get into trouble in the classroom and as his teacher’s disciplinary action, Marshall was instructed to memorize parts of the U.S. Constitution. To give you an idea of just how many times he found himself in a little trouble, by the time he had graduated from high school, Marshall had memorized the entire U.S. Constitution. September of 1926, he went on to attend college in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Lincoln University.

Marshall had always held 2-3 part-time positions to make ends meet. He was a very skilled speaker; capable of persuading any crowd with his oratory skills. Embracing this skill, Marshall decided to change his course of study to law in his second year of college.

After being rejected from his first choice university — Maryland Law School — because of his race, Marshall went on to attend one of the most well-known historically black colleges today, Howard University. During his time at Howard, Marshall became an active member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1933, not only did Marshall graduate first in his class, he also passed the bar exam later that year.

He began fighting significant civil rights cases and made equality a reality for blacks. “Overall between 1940 and 1961, Marshall won 29 of the 32 cases he argued before the U.S. Supreme Court,” (about.com).

In December of 1952, Marshall argued the infamous Brown v Board of Education case before the U.S. Supreme Court. This case was like no other. No longer were the NAACP and Marshall fighting for the segregated equal in “separate but equal” (Plessy v Ferguson 1896), but they were fighting for equal. Period.

May 17, 1954 the court ruled unanimously in Marshall’s favor. October 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall became Justice Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American to serve on the United States Supreme Court. Marshall served from the age of 59 to 82.

Thurgood Marshall  July 2, 1908 - January 24, 1993

Thurgood Marshall
July 2, 1908 – January 24, 1993

“Today’s Constitution is a realistic document of freedom only because of several corrective amendments. Those amendments speak to a sense of decency and fairness [to all].”

“Customary greeting to Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, ‘What’s shaking, chiefy baby?'”

– Thurgood Marshall

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The law is a fascinating subject. Knowledge of your country’s Constitution gives you power – just as it did for Marshall. Also, having the confidence and ambition to pursue your goal(s), whether if you started out with that goal or if it came into fruition years later after starting something totally different, takes strength and hard-work that we all possess. Like Nike says, Just Do It.

We want to know what path you chose – was it easy? Did you start out with this same path? Has it remained the same since you chose it? Comment below and let us know :)

xoxo

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Work Cited

28 Days of Royalty: Dr. Martin Luther King

Brave. Strong. Alpha man. A man who dreamed of an equal society. A society in which people are not prematurely “judged by the color of their skin [or the kinkiness of their hair or the color of their eyes or the fullness of their lips] but on the content of their character.” A society where children are not afraid to quench their thirst at the nearest water fountain and NOT necessarily at the mandated Black fountain. And in doing so, he dreamed that we wouldn’t “satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.” He had a dream that “[right here in America] little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – for “1963 [was] not an end but a beginning.”

Martin-Luther-King-I-have-a-dream

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
January 15, 1929 – April 04, 1968

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As the creator of Ce’Marie, I also have a dream.

I have a dream that our little black girls will grow up loving their black dolls just as much as their white dolls. Most importantly, that little black girls will not see being black as an ugly dead-end but as being someone who also has the creativity, strength, potential and overall capacity to succeed, just as their non-black friends.

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I have a dream that little black girls and other girls of color will see more and more girls and women who look like them in the media (books, magazines, tv shows, movies, etc.) doing great, positive things.

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I have a dream that schools, parents, and all of society will continue to teach our children about diversity and tolerance. And that we will continue to progress in our acceptance of others and their differences.

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I have a dream that little girls and their parents will not shy away from supporting diverse companies, like Ce’Marie and rkc. And that the number of diverse companies will continue to grow and show that they embrace diversity through their actions and products.

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I have a dream that little girls – brown, purple, yellow, white and black – will grow up in nurturing environments in which they are taught to love themselves and share love and kindness with others. I have a dream… I have a dream that little girls will always feel like they have an adult to talk to, help them, and not judge them for their mistakes or unfortunate circumstance(s). Girls everywhere will learn the importance of staying true to themselves and realize how much cooler it is to do so.

        

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’

– Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

~ ♥ ~

i-have-a-draemDo you have a dream? Of course you do! Comment below and let us know your dream(s) and if you’re feeling really good, include what it is that you are doing now to accomplish that dream ;)

Until next time…

xoxo,

ZeeZee Dandridge

Creator of Ce’Marie

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Photo Credits (searched through Google)

  • Photo 1: davidbrim.com
  • Photo 2: amlit-kaplan.wikispaces.com
  • Photo 3: laschoolreport.com
  • Photo 4: deeperstory.com
  • Photo 5: pinterest.com
  • Photo 6: dodgeburn.blogspot.com
  • Photo 7: bevelle.wordpress.com

Good Movie Alert: Happy Feet – Finding Your “Heart Song” (aka voice / gift / passion)

In the movie Happy Feet, baby penguins must find their “heart songs” (i.e. their voice / passion / gift). At the end of the first video clip, the teacher, Ms. Viola, states: “…a penguin without a heart song, is hardly a penguin at all.” So because it’s never been seen before-it must be wrong, right? No. Mumble later proves to us toward the end of the movie that just because something may be out of the norm and as a result make others uncomfortable, that doesn’t make a person (or a penguin in this case) any less than the norm. If you ask me, it actually gives the person an edge. Mumble’s heart song happens to be dancing. He is an adorable little penguin who cannot sing but can certainly dance his little tush off.

Cool Lesson to be Learned: We are all created differently – each of us have a special something(s) that we can contribute to society. Be open to people specialties & differences, you’d be surprised what you can learn ♥

 

Enter Ce’Marie’s World, where a girl can be a girl. Where a girl can be herself. Where a girl can dare to be different – dare to dream – dare to speak up – and dare to step outside of the box. A world where a girl is valued and loved. Where a girl is creatively free & liberated from judgement. Come join this powerful girl movement that Ce’Marie offers – in a world where a girl is encouraged to live by our motto:  ~  E m b r a c e  YOU  ♥  I n s p i r e  OTHERS  ~

Video Rights Reserved to Warner Bros
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