28 Days of Royalty: Daisy Bates

“Pioneer. Leader. Citizen. Daisy Bates: The First Lady of Little Rock.”

Enjoy these short videos below – they give you a great overview of who Daisy Bates was to her community.

“Pioneer. Leader. Citizen. Daisy Bates: The First Lady of Little Rock.”

Daisy Bates was a woman before her time – she, at a time when women were not seen as equals, spoke as a leader and made moves only men were expected to make. I am somewhat familiar with her story – as I grew up in Pine Bluff, Arkansas up until 1998. Daisy Bates vowed to make a difference. She was the president of the Little Rock NAACP chapter. Even when the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education case ruled that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional, Arkansas public schools still would not comply with the law. In 1957 Bates aided in creating the Little Rock Nine, a group of nine African American students who would eventually be permitted to attend Central High School in Little Rock. It took President Eisenhower to send federal troops to make this happen. But finally in

Throughout it all, Bates provided these students with moral support and welcomed them into her home. She was an incredible woman who stood shamelessly for the rights of blacks.

Daisy Bates November 11, 1914 - November 4, 1999

Daisy Bates
November 11, 1914 – November 4, 1999

“No man or woman who tries to pursue an ideal in his or her own way is without enemies.”

-Daisy Bates

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Work Cited:

  • bio.com
  • youtube
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28 Days of Royalty: Rosa Parks

5 Things You May Not Know About Rosa Parks (courtesy of History.com):

  1. Parks was not the first African-American woman to be arrested for refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama bus — * There were a few (2-4) others before her
  2. Parks had a prior encounter with the bus driver, James Blake, who demanded she vacate her seat for the white passenger — *He had forced her to vacate the bus once before after she refused to enter through the back door even though she payed her fare at the front door. She vowed to never ride on a bus driven by him again
  3. Parks not giving up her seat was not premeditated — *She states in her autobiography that if she had been paying attention she actually would have never gotten on Blake’s bus, thus there probably wouldn’t have been an issue on that specific day
  4. Parks was not sitting in a whites-only section — *She was sitting in a middle section that was available to African Americans
  5. Parks did not refuse to leave her seat because her feet were hurting — *Physically, she felt just as she felt any other day after a long day’s work. But mentally, she was tired of giving in

View her story below:

Rosa Parks February 4, 1913 - October 24, 2005

Rosa Parks
February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005

“You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right.”

“The only tired I was, was tired of giving in.”

“Arrest me for sitting on a bus? You may do that.”

– Rosa Parks

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Work Cited

  • bio.com
  • history.com
  • youtube.com
  • Google images

28 Days of Royalty: Harriet Tubman

Tired of the injustice. Spirit broken by the everyday occurrence of violence & abuse. Fatigued by the fight to keep her family together. Afraid that she would be sold after her former master’s death. It was time to go. To find a better life, North is where she’d flee.

Harriet Tubman was no stranger to hardship and struggle. But by 1849, she had had enough. After her husband refused to escape with her, Tubman set out to find freedom alone, around 90 miles north by way of the underground railroad. She succeed too. But she did not stop there. Tubman returned many times to the dangerous, dirty south with a mission to aid in the freedom of her family members and other slaves via the underground railroad. She became known as the “conductor” of the underground railroad, a complex, secret passageway of supportive households along the route to freedom, that would feed and house runaway slaves. Tubman is often referred to as the Moses of African-Americans,  our leader. In 1851, after the Fugitive Slave Law was passed–that required policemen of the north to help capture runaway slaves and send them back to their owners in the south–Tubman rerouted and helped slaves escape to Canada, where slavery was banned. Once the Civil War broke out, Tubman became a cook, nurse and a spy for the Union Army. Liberating more than 700 slaves in South Carolina, Tubman was the first woman to lead an “armed expedition.”

Harriet Tubman  1820 - March 10, 1913

Harriet Tubman
1820 – March 10, 1913

Watch this short, but influential 3 minute video below (courtesy of the History channel), on Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

Harriet Tubman Short Video

“I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say; I never ran my train off the track and i never lost a passenger.”

“If I could have convinced more slaves that they were slaves, I could have freed thousands more.”

“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

– Harriet Tubman

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Remember, “every great dream begins with a dreamer” and every success begins with someone who acted upon their dream…

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Work Cited:

  • biography.com
  • video: History Channel | Youtube

xox