28 Days of Royalty: Madame C.J. Walker

Determined ♥ Innovative ♥ Inspiring.

Do you have a bright idea that you think can help many people and in the process pay your bills and possibly even send your children to college? Did you give up or slow down on that idea because it was just too difficult, strenuous and/or too time-consuming to achieve? This is perfect for you! Read on and learn about a courageous African-American woman who bravely built her company from the ground up even when all odds were stacked against her and her only daughter.

Born Sarah Breedlove in 1867 on a Louisiana plantation that her parents sharecropped, Madame C.J. Walker would go on to become America’s first self-made female millionaire. Walker became an entrepreneur after suffering from a scalp disorder that resulted in severe hair loss. During the 1890’s, when her hair began to fall out, Walker sought remedies that she hoped would cure her scalp condition. In 1905, Walker began working as a sales agent for Annie Malone, another black female hair product entrepreneur. The sales position relocated Walker to Denver; this move became the catalyst for Walker’s success. There in Denver, she found her third (but short-term) husband Charles Joseph Walker, changed her name to “Madame” C.J. Walker, founded her own hair product business, and began a door-to-door sales hustle of her products. She strategically traveled the deep south to promote and teach interested potential customers how to get the most out of her products. As business picked up, Walker moved to Pittsburgh in 1908 to temporarily run her business and open a beauty college-like establishment to train her sales teams. The actions Walker took in her business were innovative, creative, and avante-garde. In 1910 she had moved her business to the then-largest inland manufacturing area, Indianapolis. There she built a factory, a one-stop shop (hair and nail beauty salon), and another beauty college. Throughout the growth of her “all-things hair and beauty” empire, Walker supported the efforts of black higher education and the civil rights movement. She donated generously to what we know today as Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU’s) and to organizations like the NAACP.

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Madame C.J. Walker December 23, 1867 - May 25, 1919

Madame C.J. Walker
December 23, 1867 – May 25, 1919

“I got my start by giving myself a start.”

“One night I had a dream, and in that dream a big black man appeared to me and told me what to mix up for my hair. I made up my mind that I would begin to sell it.”

“I am a woman who came from the cotton fields of the south. From there I was promoted to the washtub. From there I was promoted to the cook kitchen. And from there I promoted myself into the business of manufacturing hair goods and preparations. I have built my own factory on my own ground.”

– Madame C.J. Walker

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Embarking upon the entrepreneurship path is not an easy one but it is a well-worth-it one. Each individual is born with and acquire through schooling and training special skills and talents. If there is a special something you do well and enjoy doing, take the leap! Be bold and put the fears to the side. Become the entrepreneur you are absolutely capable of becoming. Requirements: Hard-work. Dedication. Time. Persistence. Patience and Positivity. Believe in yourself and your capabilities. Do your homework and research whatever it is to learn more and to stay in the know.

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Work Cited

  • madamecjwalker.com
  • video: WSHH youtube
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28 Days of Royalty: Ida B. Wells

There really are some incredible women in our past, our present and to-be in our future. One of which is a brave African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist and civil rights leader named Ida B. Wells.

She was a force to be reckoned with.

Ida B. Wells was born July 16, 1862 in Holy Springs, Mississippi. In the late 1880’s, Wells worked as a teacher at a segregated-all-black elementary school to provide for her siblings after the death of her parents and a younger sibling during the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She resented the fact that she was paid $25/month while white teachers were paid more than triple the amount, ~$80/month. Fueled by her resentment and the “reign of terror” violence that came down on African-Americans, Wells used her talents in writing and social skills to spread awareness about the plight of the negro people. She wrote extensively on the lynchings that were still taking place in America post-Civil War’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. A lot of Wells writing assessed the motives behind the violence black people were experiencing. Like the lynchings, she believed it was done to tame and stifle the growth and ambitions of blacks who competed with whites. In addition to Wells’ active involvement in the civil rights movement, she was also an activist of the women’s suffrage movement that fought for the rights of women.

“For more than 40 years, Ida B. Wells was one of the most fearless and respected women in the United States. [She] was one of the most articulate women of her time,” (idabwells.org).

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Ida B. Wells
July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931

“Somebody must show that the Afro-American race is more sinned against than sinning, and it seems to have fallen upon me to do so.”

“The Afro-American is not a bestial race.”

– Ida B. Wells

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Interesting Fact: Wells was one of the first people to fight for blacks’ right to sit wherever they please on public transportation. After being physically forced by the conductor to vacate a Memphis, Tennessee train in 1884, Wells filed a lawsuit against the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad for wrongfully vetoing her decision to sit in the ladies coach section of the train. After articulating her experience in an article, she seemed to have found her calling in writing.

Ida B. Wells is a great person to study for many reasons, especially if you are interested in journalism. Writing this post was both fun and educational – which by the way is #WhatCe’MarieIsAllAbout ;) – it was difficult to stop adding information. We try to keep the posts short and scrumptious – we know how it is to have the attention span of a fly haha jk

Do you have a daughter or know a young girl or boy who is interested in a career in journalism or even just loves to write? Maybe you have someone in mind who could learn something new today (we all do!) why not let that “newness” be about Ms. Ida B. Wells? :) Share or forward this post with a friend and with the friend of a friend. Let’s spread the love ♥

28 Days of Royalty: Dr. Martin Luther King

Brave. Strong. Alpha man. A man who dreamed of an equal society. A society in which people are not prematurely “judged by the color of their skin [or the kinkiness of their hair or the color of their eyes or the fullness of their lips] but on the content of their character.” A society where children are not afraid to quench their thirst at the nearest water fountain and NOT necessarily at the mandated Black fountain. And in doing so, he dreamed that we wouldn’t “satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.” He had a dream that “[right here in America] little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – for “1963 [was] not an end but a beginning.”

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
January 15, 1929 – April 04, 1968

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As the creator of Ce’Marie, I also have a dream.

I have a dream that our little black girls will grow up loving their black dolls just as much as their white dolls. Most importantly, that little black girls will not see being black as an ugly dead-end but as being someone who also has the creativity, strength, potential and overall capacity to succeed, just as their non-black friends.

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I have a dream that little black girls and other girls of color will see more and more girls and women who look like them in the media (books, magazines, tv shows, movies, etc.) doing great, positive things.

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I have a dream that schools, parents, and all of society will continue to teach our children about diversity and tolerance. And that we will continue to progress in our acceptance of others and their differences.

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I have a dream that little girls and their parents will not shy away from supporting diverse companies, like Ce’Marie and rkc. And that the number of diverse companies will continue to grow and show that they embrace diversity through their actions and products.

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I have a dream that little girls – brown, purple, yellow, white and black – will grow up in nurturing environments in which they are taught to love themselves and share love and kindness with others. I have a dream… I have a dream that little girls will always feel like they have an adult to talk to, help them, and not judge them for their mistakes or unfortunate circumstance(s). Girls everywhere will learn the importance of staying true to themselves and realize how much cooler it is to do so.

        

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’

– Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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i-have-a-draemDo you have a dream? Of course you do! Comment below and let us know your dream(s) and if you’re feeling really good, include what it is that you are doing now to accomplish that dream ;)

Until next time…

xoxo,

ZeeZee Dandridge

Creator of Ce’Marie

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Photo Credits (searched through Google)

  • Photo 1: davidbrim.com
  • Photo 2: amlit-kaplan.wikispaces.com
  • Photo 3: laschoolreport.com
  • Photo 4: deeperstory.com
  • Photo 5: pinterest.com
  • Photo 6: dodgeburn.blogspot.com
  • Photo 7: bevelle.wordpress.com

NEW! Ce’Marie Website ♥

Hello Ce’Marie Tribe!

The Ce’Marie website is up and running – Go check it out! :)

http://www.cemarie.info

It is a work in progress in which we are excited about. We are working towards making it more interactive for our Ce’Marie Tribe members. Head over to the website and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments field below.

First Lady ❤

Happy Birthday to the wonderful, phenomenal, gorgeous, Mrs. Michelle Obama.

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High Fashion ♥ Obama Couture

To you:

Phenomenal Woman

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size
But when I start to tell them,
They think I’m telling lies.
I say,
It’s in the reach of my arms,
The span of my hips,
The stride of my step,
The curl of my lips.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.
Then they swarm around me,
A hive of honey bees.
I say,
It’s the fire in my eyes,
And the flash of my teeth,
The swing in my waist,
And the joy in my feet.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Men themselves have wondered
What they see in me.
They try so much
But they can’t touch
My inner mystery.
When I try to show them,
They say they still can’t see.
I say,
It’s in the arch of my back,
The sun of my smile,
The ride of my breasts,
The grace of my style.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Now you understand
Just why my head’s not bowed.
I don’t shout or jump about
Or have to talk real loud.
When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,
The bend of my hair,
The palm of my hand,
The need for my care.
‘Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.
—Maya Angelou

Oprah calls Maya Angelou’s poem, [Phenomenal Woman], “life defining.” So we dedicate this beautiful poem to First Lady, Michelle Obama.

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[What’s A Girl To Do…]: Girl Power To The Rescueeee…!!

What’s a girl to do when life gets in the way?

First, take a deep breath in, let it out. Again, deep breath in, let it out… Now realize as women:

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Ladies, WE CAN DO IT!!

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Girl Power to the Rescueee!

What’s a girl to do when she’s feeling “Tony the Tiger” Grrrrrreeaaat?!

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Tony the Tiger

Rejoice! & Write it down
* When you’re feeling super great: Share girl empowerment messages to a neighbor / peer / friend / relative who may need a quick pick-me-up, keep in mind that we never know what others are going through and your positivity can rub off unto them..Also, why not record these feelings into a special, designated affirmation journal.

What’s a girl to do when she’s feeling down?
Seek inner empowerment that you have been building since birth…

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Ohhh Yea ♥ Believe it ♥ We’ve Got This Ability!! :)

* Since birth, you and I have been snapping back after hardships, set backs, disappointments, etc. Even as babies, when we failed to stand up on our own and take our first step, we plummeted right back down. But, then we got right back up and tried again until ultimately we achieved our goal of not only walking but running! Remember: We are super-Wonderwomen: If it doesn’t kill us, it makes us stronger!

What’s a girl to do when she’s feeling on top of the world-lucky?

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On top of the world fantastic!

Write down the positive emotions to save for a later rainy day…
* Rainy days seem to just creep up on us at the worst timing. So a way to combat a “rainy day” mood is to look back on the many awesome, “today was a good day”, Ice Cube moods & moments. What the heck are Ice Cube moods, you ask? The moods & moments that totally had you feeling on top of the world –  sometime in the past, like yesterday or a month ago or even three years ago (like a graduation or some other big accomplishment).

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Although a little cheesy, the point of this post is to remind ladies (and girls) out there to make light of situations that otherwise could have put us in bad moods. Sometimes we prematurely make a big deal out of simple everyday situations — but just as the uncomfortable situation came up, it too will pass. Let’s pursue our best — not perfection, but our best and keep in mind that things will always happen, good and bad. So with every “thing” that happens, we can essentially do one of three things:

1. Take it in stride and do your best to set aside the emotions & pessimistic thoughts and forge through it as effectively as possible; 2. Realize the issue, panic and complain, allow negative thoughts to take over, then try to fix the issue; or 3. Convince yourself that you are incapable, the world is coming to an end anyway, and all there is left to do is mope around and wait for either the issue to resolve itself or the world to come to its end… (<– totally over-dramatized, please, ladies, remember we are super Wonderwomen & option 3 is NEVER an option).

And let’s be realistic, we want to always do option 1 but although we are super-Wonderwomen, we are not perfect. So be patient with yourself. Don’t beat yourself up for “accidentally” acting out option 2 – just work harder towards being a more positive and proactive person. This way you won’t give yourself unnecessary stress.

We are a work in progress – don’t strive for society’s goal of perfection, strive for excellence of your unique capabilities  :)

So, which (of option 1 & 2) will you choose today?

We would love to hear what it is that you do when life hands you lemons. How do you turn life’s hurdles into lemonade? Please comment below :)

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Girl Power. #WhatCeMarieIsAbout

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Photo Credits (searched through Google):

  1. blogs.thepoconos.com
  2. pdxgem.blogspot.com
  3. gigieatscelebrities.com
  4. grrrlcamp.tumblr.com
  5. huffingtonpost.com
  6. etsy.com
  7. pdxgem.blogspot.com