5 Good Reasons to Take Your Kids to the Library

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When I was around 3 or 4 years old, I remember my mother took me to the local public library. I was an avid reader by that age, whether I read the words correctly or not, I was a true storyteller – sharing an elaborate story based off its illustrations alone.

So going to a place that housed so many books, on top of books, on top of books… I was right in literary heaven! From colorful picture books to interesting topic-specific fact books, I wanted them all to come home with me. And with my new library card in tow, the library became a weekly venture for my mother and I.

Why should you make sure your kids take occasional trips to the library? Christine French Cully, Editor in Chief of Highlight Children, provides these 5 Reasons to Take Your Kids to the Library:

1. Regular library visits inevitably leads to more reading.

  • Remember, within the first 5 years of a child’s life, their brain and knowledge is working at a faster rate than it’ll ever work. So go, feed that baby’s brain. They’ll thank you in a big way later, after graduating from an Ivy League university ;)

2. When you visit the library, you can expose your kids to more books and magazines than you can afford to buy.

  • Take home as many cool books as you can carry out to the car. Then after that load is read, return it and get a whole new pile of books. Explore the many aisles of the children’s section and allow your kid to pick up his/her favorites. It doesn’t get much better than that.

3. Your local children’s librarian can recommend books that you may not know of or think to suggest, broadening their tastes and expanding their minds and vocabulary

  • Constant learning and exploring their imagination is the point, right? :) And you’ll be surprised – by what books you may see as random – your child fall in love with and want read to him/her every night

4. Library time is active, not passive

  • Libraries often host events where they bring in animated storytellers, different engaging shows and even the authors themselves come in and interact with the kids. Connecting with their favorite books and its authors along with the other little library goers, really gives the children an invaluable experience.

5. Owning a library card teaches kids responsibility.

  • Owning their own library card make kids feel responsible and important. They learn to keep up with it and value their belongings.

To read the entire, original article, click here.

How about you – what are your library stories? Do these 5 reasons sound about right to you? Or based off the 5 reasons will you now take your kids more often? Let us know below! :) #SomethingAboutCeMarie? She loves books!

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Work Cited

Original article is courtesy of Huffington Post.

View the original article here.

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

I read an article from the Huffington Post that spoke directly to me, because it was about me; I felt like it was a brochure educating people on what to expect from working with me or being around me… yes, me, Huffington Post wrote an article on me. Haha :) Anyway, I found it interesting, maybe you will too. Parents, if you ever notice your children doing one of the following things, don’t be alarmed – they can’t help it… they’re just creative ♥♡

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently (an article by Carolyn Gregoire)

1. We Daydream

  • Creative types know, despite what their third-grade teachers may have said, that daydreaming is anything but a waste of time. (Excerpt from the article)

2. We Observe Everything

  • The world is a creative person’s oyster — they see possibilities everywhere and are constantly taking in information that becomes fodder for creative expression. As Henry James is widely quoted, a writer is someone on whom “nothing is lost.” (Excerpt from the article)

3. We Work the Hours that Works for Us

  • Many great artists have said that they do their best work either very early in the morning or late at night. (Excerpt from the article)

4. We Take Time for Solitude

  • “In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone,” wrote the American existential psychologist Rollo May. (Excerpt from the article)

5. We Turn Life’s Obstacles Around

  • Many of the most iconic stories and songs of all time have been inspired by gut-wrenching pain and heartbreak — and the silver lining of these challenges is that they may have been the catalyst to create great art. (Excerpt from the article)

6. We Seek Out New Experiences

  • Creative people love to expose themselves to new experiences, sensations and states of mind — and this openness is a significant predictor of creative output. (Excerpt from the article)

7. We “Fail Up.”

  • Resilience is practically a prerequisite for creative success, says Kaufman. Doing creative work is often described as a process of failing repeatedly until you find something that sticks, and creatives — at least the successful ones — learn not to take failure so personally. (Excerpt from the article)

8. We Ask the Big Questions

  • Creative people are insatiably curious — they generally opt to live the examined life, and even as they get older, maintain a sense of curiosity about life. (Excerpt from the article)

9. We People-Watch

  • Observant by nature and curious about the lives of others, creative types often love to people-watch — and they may generate some of their best ideas from it. (Excerpt from the article)

10. We Take Risks

  • Part of doing creative work is taking risks, and many creative types thrive off of taking risks in various aspects of their lives. (Excerpt from the article)

11. We View All of Life as an Opportunity of Self-Expression

  • Nietzsche believed that one’s life and the world should be viewed as a work of art. Creative types may be more likely to see the world this way, and to constantly seek opportunities for self-expression in everyday life. (Excerpt from the article)

12. We Follow Our True Passions

  • Creative people tend to be intrinsically motivated — meaning that they’re motivated to act from some internal desire, rather than a desire for external reward or recognition. Psychologists have shown that creative people are energized by challenging activities, a sign of intrinsic motivation, and the research suggests that simply thinking of intrinsic reasons to perform an activity may be enough to boost creativity. (Excerpt from the article)

13. We Get Out of Our Own Heads

  • Kaufman argues that another purpose of daydreaming is to help us to get out of our own limited perspective and explore other ways of thinking, which can be an important asset to creative work. (Excerpt from the article)

14. We Lose Track of the Time (all the time…)

  • Creative types may find that when they’re writing, dancing, painting or expressing themselves in another way, they get “in the zone,” or what’s known as a flow state, which can help them to create at their highest level. Flow is a mental state when an individual transcends conscious thought to reach a heightened state of effortless concentration and calmness. When someone is in this state, they’re practically immune to any internal or external pressures and distractions that could hinder their performance. (Excerpt from the article)

15. We Surround Ourselves with Beauty

  • Creatives tend to have excellent taste, and as a result, they enjoy being surrounded by beauty. (Excerpt from the article)

16. We Connect the Dots

  • If there’s one thing that distinguishes highly creative people from others, it’s the ability to see possibilities where other don’t — or, in other words, vision. Many great artists and writers have said that creativity is simply the ability to connect the dots that others might never think to connect. (Excerpt from the article)

17. We Constantly Shake Things Up

  • Diversity of experience, more than anything else, is critical to creativity, says Kaufman. Creatives like to shake things up, experience new things, and avoid anything that makes life more monotonous or mundane. (Excerpt from the article)

18. We Make Time for Mindfulness

  • Creative types understand the value of a clear and focused mind — because their work depends on it. Many artists, entrepreneurs, writers and other creative workers, such as David Lynch, have turned to meditation as a tool for tapping into their most creative state of mind. (Excerpt from the article)

To read more about each, click here to view the original Huffington Post article from Carolyn Gregoire.

Stay creative, my friends. xoxo

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Work Cited:

Gregoire, Carolyn. “18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently.” Huffington Post 04 Mar. 2014. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/04/creativity-habits_n_4859769.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular&gt;.

  • All information (outside of the first paragraph) in this post is from this article. All rights reserved to the Huffington Post.