Who is Ce’Marie?

Who is Ce’Marie? Unsure what Ce’Marie World is all about?

I’ve got you covered! Below you’ll find the ‘About Ce’Marie’ synopsis, which you can also find housed under the ‘About Ce’Marie‘ tab. Read on and get a better sense of who Ce’Marie is. Please share your thoughts at the bottom :)

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Welcome to the Fabulous ♥ Fashion World of Ce’Marie! We’re excited you stopped by for a visit :)

Who is Ce’Marie: Ce’Marie is a young, spunky girl. This blog highlights her and all that she stands for — which is equality, creativity, and individuality. Ce’Marie is smart and imaginative. She loves a challenge and lives for adventures.

Our Audience: Ce’Marie World is mostly for the parents and educators of smart, brave, ‘not-your-average’ “princesses” (princesses inclusive of all: tomboys, daddy’s and mommy’s little girls, athletes, etc. – all of who are brave and special in their own way).  Non-profits and other people and establishments that cater to the needs and bright futures of young girls, can find their place here as well. You’ll also find articles for your little girls here, too. We are all in this movement together!

Think About It: Share her adventures and explore with her in her world of imagination…

Let’s take a moment to imagine your daughter expanding her mind, growing her imagination, and loving reading. Now imagine her exploring all the possibilities of who she can be. Ce’Marie books offers this & so much more! Let your daughter get hooked on reading with Ce’Marie as we expose the best, long-kept secret: Being different is the new black.

Our Mission: At Ce’Marie, we are dedicated to empowering young, fashion-forward minds with strength and self-esteem in a fun, educational way. Imagination is everything to us. We provide a safe, encouraging environment to dream and explore the possibilities. Through creativity and validation, our goals are to put more people in the media who “look like us” and to teach girls the importance of living by our motto: “E m b r a c e YOU. I n s p i r e OTHERS.” ©

Find Us! You can find Ce’Marie in action in her empowering and fashionably illustrated picture book series, self-titled Ce’Marie (coming out this summer). The book series follow her many girlhood adventures. So be sure as to always check back here with us for news, advice and quirky facts about all things girl-power and/or Ce’Marie related! — As Ce’Marie will learn and expose one of the most important, long-kept secrets to your little girls:
Being Different is the New Black.

Join the movement! Fill in the form below to be added to our email newsletters, or if you have questions, comments or concerns, leave us a note :)

#RockACrown[LA] and #BringBackOurGirls!

Wow, how could I forget to share this event with you all! Ce’Marie and I attended a wonderful event this past Sunday afternoon. It was called #RockACrownLA.

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The purpose of the event was to raise awareness of the #BringOurDaughtersBack movement. A good 35-40 LA dwellers came together to pray and stand in solidarity at Manhattan Beach on May 4th. I heard about it via social media and instantly knew I wanted to be a part of it.

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As we walked up to the designated meeting area, we noticed a group of gals and guys – old and young – gathered in a circle. It was such a beautiful thing. Everyone had on their head-wrap “crowns”, as suggested by the organizers. With my head-wrap on, I felt a sense of connection to the young Nigerian girls.

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Unsurprisingly though, a lot of people had no idea what had occurred in Nigeria on April 15th. So they had no clue as to why we were there. There were some who thought we were preparing for a church ritual while others thought someone had just gotten married. After explaining to curious onlookers why we gathered there and what we were doing – they were stunned at the news. They had not previously heard about what happened to the over 300 Nigerian schoolgirls. And what touched my heart, outside of the event itself, were those who, after being informed of why we were there, stopped what they were doing and joined us for the cause – signing both the petition on charity.org and the contact sheet with their information for notice on future #Bringbackourgirls events.

I left the event feeling a great sense of inspiration. From church to brunch then lastly to the beach, I had had a wonderful, invigorating Sunday.

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How about you? Have you been enjoying your weekends? Do you fill them with activities that you are passionate about? Tell us below :)

 

 

#BringBackOurGirls

Dear Friends,

It has been 23 days since my friends in Nigeria went missing from their beds on the night of April 15th, 2014.

I am sad and hurt by this tragedy. But I remain hopeful.

I pray everyday for all of my friends that are missing, along with their families, my other friends remaining in the area, the people of Nigeria and my American friends who have friends and/or family affected by the kidnapping.

My mommy has been allowing me to watch the news coverage about the kidnappings with her. She knows how much the well-being of the kidnapped girls mean to me. The news lady had announced around April 16th or 17th that at least 53 girls were able to escape. My mother and I were so happy to hear this! However, there are still at least 234 of our friends out there who have not returned home. But I remain hopeful.

I asked my mommy, the day after it aired, how such a thing could happen to them when they were under the supervision of their school’s officials. ‘Cause at my school, there are so many rules about the fence that protects the perimeter of my school. Like, no talking through the fence, no going outside of the fence, no fetching flying balls on the other side of the fence, no shoving things through the fence, no playing on the fence, no looking at the fence…ok, I made this last one up – but I think you get my point :). My school is very strict about the fence. And I used to hate that and complained to my mom all the time about it. But she would always tell me it was for our safety from strangers.

Now, I understand.

The news lady also told us that the men who took my friends came late at night while everyone was sleeping. I usually talk to my friend, Adebukola (I like to call her “Kola”), at least once a month around 9:00pm her time and 1:00pm my time. And my other friend, Ifeolu (I call her LuLo), at least once a month as well, but the time fluctuates. I have not heard from either of them since the kidnapping took place at their school, Chibok Government Girls Secondary School. I am worried. But I still remain hopeful. Because I know that my friends are all strong and smart. And every night before I go to sleep, my mommy, daddy, sister, brothers and I pray for them together. I pray that they are all safe and unharmed. I pray that they are even stronger than expected and more intelligent beyond their age and grade level so that they are able to figure out their escape. I also pray that Kola and Lulo are OK and safe at home with their parents.

I hope our prayers are being heard each night.

Friends, I must go now. I want to catch the ending of Oprah reruns with my mom. But I will keep you updated on whatever I hear about our girls. I will also let you know immediately when my friends either skype, email or write me a letter – I know my friends are well and safe and I am positive that I will be hearing from them soon. My mommy tells me to just pray and watch out for their communication. And I do. Everyday after school, I run home, check the mailbox, log onto skype and turn the alerts volume all the way up so that even if I am outside, I will hear the skype ringer.

xoxo,

Ce’Marie

 

 

My High School Blues… Your Daughter’s Gold

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March 12, 2014.

Dear Parents:

After visiting the junior high school that I had attended a good 12-13 years prior, I decided to also stop by my old high school that I attended for four long years of my life. Looking back on it, those years seemed to have quickly went by, I mean, I can barely remember them now in great detail. However, once I passed its entryway, I was flooded with memories. Some good, and a lot bad.

At that moment, I remembered the days I was made to feel nervous and anxious. Those days I thought about; “Would today would be the day I would have to use the Snapple bottle I had packed in my backpack the night before for protection.” Yes, you read correctly. This is a sad reality of what kids sometimes feel they need to do in order to stand up for themselves – I was a teenager and I felt like I couldn’t just let them pounce on me without at least attempting to protect myself – I had to put up a good fight.

Looking back, I must say… I am so, so, sooo happy I never had to (or more like I didn’t have the balls to) use it. Because truth be told, that bottle could have done some serious damage. Damage that I would not dare wish to carry out on another human being, even if they were making my high school years miserable. I know this today but that wasn’t my concern back then. And now that I look back on it, I feel like I carried it more as something to ease my mind so that I was able to get through the day without the constant worry of someone messing with me… it made me feel secure. I never had the intention on using it deliberately, it was just the plan Z, a “just in case”…  And although I only carried it maybe 2-3 times (a week tops) during my entire four year attendance there, there is no doubt that there were many times that my best friend and I did not feel safe at school. For unknown, concrete reasons, some girls seemed to have been pursuing a vendetta against my bff and myself.

This was a problem then and it is even a greater problem now – in today’s schools.

After speaking with the counselor at my old junior high school, I was made aware of the bullying that goes on, which I would say is even worse than what I endured. Due to social media “mean girls” are able to taunt kids beyond 3pm. So even when school lets out for the day, the bullying does not stop (as it did when I was in high school – actually sometimes we had confrontations on the public transportation that we all took and relied on, but that was not often). And even beyond that, it has the potential to even follow you to other levels and phases of life, like college and grad school. This ugly truth is not okay. The exact opposite should be happening – the amount of bullying cases should be decreasing and our youth should feel more safe than their parents felt in school. That is how progress is made.

With that said, this is why I do what is that I do. I want to help young girls. I want to reach out to those who are without guidance, afraid, full of doubt or hurting so that I can not only share with them my story but so that I can hopefully inspire and prevent them from feeling a need to carry a Snapple bottle in their backpack as protection. No girl should have to do that. No one should have to do that.

I write and illustrate children’s books as a way to share my experiences, not only with bullying, but also with low self-esteem, shyness, fear and anxiety, peer pressure, and so on. Through my experiences, along with research, I will educate young girls on how to cope with fear, stress and other issues and emotions girls face, in a fun and fashionable way. It is time for girls to see the “cool-ness” in embracing themselves and conquering their dreams no matter what. I intend to show just that. So stick around for the adventures.

xoxo

Today – International Women’s Day ♥

Today is International Women’s Day!

We love to spotlight days like this. It’s awesome that there are so many organizations around the world that continues the fight & work towards equality for women. And I am especially happy that the Women’s Suffrage did not just end once women were given the right to vote. Enjoy some empowerment below:

“A charming woman doesn’t follow the crowd. She is herself.”

– Loretta Young

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“The fastest way to change society is to mobilize the women of the world.”

-Charles Malik

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“If you want something said, ask a man; if you want something done, ask a woman.”

– Margaret Thatcher

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For more information on International Women’s Day – visit their website by clicking on their logo below or by clicking here:

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Work Cited:

  • Google images

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

I read an article from the Huffington Post that spoke directly to me, because it was about me; I felt like it was a brochure educating people on what to expect from working with me or being around me… yes, me, Huffington Post wrote an article on me. Haha :) Anyway, I found it interesting, maybe you will too. Parents, if you ever notice your children doing one of the following things, don’t be alarmed – they can’t help it… they’re just creative ♥♡

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently (an article by Carolyn Gregoire)

1. We Daydream

  • Creative types know, despite what their third-grade teachers may have said, that daydreaming is anything but a waste of time. (Excerpt from the article)

2. We Observe Everything

  • The world is a creative person’s oyster — they see possibilities everywhere and are constantly taking in information that becomes fodder for creative expression. As Henry James is widely quoted, a writer is someone on whom “nothing is lost.” (Excerpt from the article)

3. We Work the Hours that Works for Us

  • Many great artists have said that they do their best work either very early in the morning or late at night. (Excerpt from the article)

4. We Take Time for Solitude

  • “In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone,” wrote the American existential psychologist Rollo May. (Excerpt from the article)

5. We Turn Life’s Obstacles Around

  • Many of the most iconic stories and songs of all time have been inspired by gut-wrenching pain and heartbreak — and the silver lining of these challenges is that they may have been the catalyst to create great art. (Excerpt from the article)

6. We Seek Out New Experiences

  • Creative people love to expose themselves to new experiences, sensations and states of mind — and this openness is a significant predictor of creative output. (Excerpt from the article)

7. We “Fail Up.”

  • Resilience is practically a prerequisite for creative success, says Kaufman. Doing creative work is often described as a process of failing repeatedly until you find something that sticks, and creatives — at least the successful ones — learn not to take failure so personally. (Excerpt from the article)

8. We Ask the Big Questions

  • Creative people are insatiably curious — they generally opt to live the examined life, and even as they get older, maintain a sense of curiosity about life. (Excerpt from the article)

9. We People-Watch

  • Observant by nature and curious about the lives of others, creative types often love to people-watch — and they may generate some of their best ideas from it. (Excerpt from the article)

10. We Take Risks

  • Part of doing creative work is taking risks, and many creative types thrive off of taking risks in various aspects of their lives. (Excerpt from the article)

11. We View All of Life as an Opportunity of Self-Expression

  • Nietzsche believed that one’s life and the world should be viewed as a work of art. Creative types may be more likely to see the world this way, and to constantly seek opportunities for self-expression in everyday life. (Excerpt from the article)

12. We Follow Our True Passions

  • Creative people tend to be intrinsically motivated — meaning that they’re motivated to act from some internal desire, rather than a desire for external reward or recognition. Psychologists have shown that creative people are energized by challenging activities, a sign of intrinsic motivation, and the research suggests that simply thinking of intrinsic reasons to perform an activity may be enough to boost creativity. (Excerpt from the article)

13. We Get Out of Our Own Heads

  • Kaufman argues that another purpose of daydreaming is to help us to get out of our own limited perspective and explore other ways of thinking, which can be an important asset to creative work. (Excerpt from the article)

14. We Lose Track of the Time (all the time…)

  • Creative types may find that when they’re writing, dancing, painting or expressing themselves in another way, they get “in the zone,” or what’s known as a flow state, which can help them to create at their highest level. Flow is a mental state when an individual transcends conscious thought to reach a heightened state of effortless concentration and calmness. When someone is in this state, they’re practically immune to any internal or external pressures and distractions that could hinder their performance. (Excerpt from the article)

15. We Surround Ourselves with Beauty

  • Creatives tend to have excellent taste, and as a result, they enjoy being surrounded by beauty. (Excerpt from the article)

16. We Connect the Dots

  • If there’s one thing that distinguishes highly creative people from others, it’s the ability to see possibilities where other don’t — or, in other words, vision. Many great artists and writers have said that creativity is simply the ability to connect the dots that others might never think to connect. (Excerpt from the article)

17. We Constantly Shake Things Up

  • Diversity of experience, more than anything else, is critical to creativity, says Kaufman. Creatives like to shake things up, experience new things, and avoid anything that makes life more monotonous or mundane. (Excerpt from the article)

18. We Make Time for Mindfulness

  • Creative types understand the value of a clear and focused mind — because their work depends on it. Many artists, entrepreneurs, writers and other creative workers, such as David Lynch, have turned to meditation as a tool for tapping into their most creative state of mind. (Excerpt from the article)

To read more about each, click here to view the original Huffington Post article from Carolyn Gregoire.

Stay creative, my friends. xoxo

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Work Cited:

Gregoire, Carolyn. “18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently.” Huffington Post 04 Mar. 2014. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/04/creativity-habits_n_4859769.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular&gt;.

  • All information (outside of the first paragraph) in this post is from this article. All rights reserved to the Huffington Post.

28 Days Of Royalty: A Black Woman’s Smile

Good Morning Mothers,

*♥* This video is for you, not the babies – please be advised that the video requires Parental Guidance.

If you’ve ever been called an angry black woman, or asked to give your opinion on behalf of all your people, or went to a predominately other (Caucasian, Asian, etc.) university in which you’ve been mocked or chastised by the others or even by your fellow African Americans because you being you is simply different from them being them, or maybe you are from a background of mixed ethnicity and people attempt to degrade and downgrade you as if you are any less than who or what they are…

We understand.

Some forget the past and are insensitive to the fact that some people have a long history of turmoil, pain and hardship… However, I urge you to not sulk around and dwell on this. Let’s end the cycle of pulling out the “race card” just because we can. And instead, I challenge you to speak up and act peacefully towards a real change — and in doing so, if that’s labeled as pulling out the “race card”, so be it. It is not enough to just get angry at the ignorance we witness and are subject to but it is especially not recommended to throw ignorance at ignorance. So I propose we do our part in helping the next generation(s) see a different day and age. And in doing so, smile… Help combat the stereotype of black women being angry all the time.

Let’s work towards bringing to fruition a day and age where our children are aware of their worth. Content with the things that are happening for and by them. Aware of history – their own and beyond that. Eager to help, serve, love and be kind to others. And unapologetic for their differences–i.e. their natural skin tone and natural – big hair, larger than “average” nose and other features, likeness of a certain genre(s) of music, clothing, topics, etc. and/or choice of study in school and career.

Over at Ce’Marie headquarters, we are working towards our goal of getting more diversity into the media – first step, book 1 of la Ce’Marie picture book series.

What are you doing to make a difference for today and our future generations? Please share below :)

Until next time,

xoxo

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Work Cited:

  • Video: Ty Gray El spoken word & youtube

Valentine Cards Bring Smiles to Kids at CHLA

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Ce’Marie Tribe! Wonderful news – I am excited to share that the efforts of the Children Hospitals of Los Angeles to give each child patient a bag full of valentines day cards and goodies was a success! The children were not able to attend school on valentine’s day, thus they were not expecting any cards or candy on that day.

Nice people from all around the world helped make it happen – cards were filled out then delivered on valentines day to the children – ours included! It warmed our heart to see the event had such a great turnout and positive impact on the kids. Give yourselves a pat on the back – we brought a smile to some child’s face ♥ 2.14.14

http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/video?id=9433101 << click on link to check out abc news’ coverage of the event

28 Days of Royalty: Ida B. Wells

There really are some incredible women in our past, our present and to-be in our future. One of which is a brave African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist and civil rights leader named Ida B. Wells.

She was a force to be reckoned with.

Ida B. Wells was born July 16, 1862 in Holy Springs, Mississippi. In the late 1880’s, Wells worked as a teacher at a segregated-all-black elementary school to provide for her siblings after the death of her parents and a younger sibling during the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She resented the fact that she was paid $25/month while white teachers were paid more than triple the amount, ~$80/month. Fueled by her resentment and the “reign of terror” violence that came down on African-Americans, Wells used her talents in writing and social skills to spread awareness about the plight of the negro people. She wrote extensively on the lynchings that were still taking place in America post-Civil War’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. A lot of Wells writing assessed the motives behind the violence black people were experiencing. Like the lynchings, she believed it was done to tame and stifle the growth and ambitions of blacks who competed with whites. In addition to Wells’ active involvement in the civil rights movement, she was also an activist of the women’s suffrage movement that fought for the rights of women.

“For more than 40 years, Ida B. Wells was one of the most fearless and respected women in the United States. [She] was one of the most articulate women of her time,” (idabwells.org).

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Ida B. Wells
July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931

“Somebody must show that the Afro-American race is more sinned against than sinning, and it seems to have fallen upon me to do so.”

“The Afro-American is not a bestial race.”

– Ida B. Wells

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Interesting Fact: Wells was one of the first people to fight for blacks’ right to sit wherever they please on public transportation. After being physically forced by the conductor to vacate a Memphis, Tennessee train in 1884, Wells filed a lawsuit against the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad for wrongfully vetoing her decision to sit in the ladies coach section of the train. After articulating her experience in an article, she seemed to have found her calling in writing.

Ida B. Wells is a great person to study for many reasons, especially if you are interested in journalism. Writing this post was both fun and educational – which by the way is #WhatCe’MarieIsAllAbout ;) – it was difficult to stop adding information. We try to keep the posts short and scrumptious – we know how it is to have the attention span of a fly haha jk

Do you have a daughter or know a young girl or boy who is interested in a career in journalism or even just loves to write? Maybe you have someone in mind who could learn something new today (we all do!) why not let that “newness” be about Ms. Ida B. Wells? :) Share or forward this post with a friend and with the friend of a friend. Let’s spread the love ♥

28 Days of Royalty: Dr. Martin Luther King

Brave. Strong. Alpha man. A man who dreamed of an equal society. A society in which people are not prematurely “judged by the color of their skin [or the kinkiness of their hair or the color of their eyes or the fullness of their lips] but on the content of their character.” A society where children are not afraid to quench their thirst at the nearest water fountain and NOT necessarily at the mandated Black fountain. And in doing so, he dreamed that we wouldn’t “satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.” He had a dream that “[right here in America] little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.”

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – for “1963 [was] not an end but a beginning.”

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
January 15, 1929 – April 04, 1968

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As the creator of Ce’Marie, I also have a dream.

I have a dream that our little black girls will grow up loving their black dolls just as much as their white dolls. Most importantly, that little black girls will not see being black as an ugly dead-end but as being someone who also has the creativity, strength, potential and overall capacity to succeed, just as their non-black friends.

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I have a dream that little black girls and other girls of color will see more and more girls and women who look like them in the media (books, magazines, tv shows, movies, etc.) doing great, positive things.

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I have a dream that schools, parents, and all of society will continue to teach our children about diversity and tolerance. And that we will continue to progress in our acceptance of others and their differences.

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I have a dream that little girls and their parents will not shy away from supporting diverse companies, like Ce’Marie and rkc. And that the number of diverse companies will continue to grow and show that they embrace diversity through their actions and products.

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I have a dream that little girls – brown, purple, yellow, white and black – will grow up in nurturing environments in which they are taught to love themselves and share love and kindness with others. I have a dream… I have a dream that little girls will always feel like they have an adult to talk to, help them, and not judge them for their mistakes or unfortunate circumstance(s). Girls everywhere will learn the importance of staying true to themselves and realize how much cooler it is to do so.

        

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’

– Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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i-have-a-draemDo you have a dream? Of course you do! Comment below and let us know your dream(s) and if you’re feeling really good, include what it is that you are doing now to accomplish that dream ;)

Until next time…

xoxo,

ZeeZee Dandridge

Creator of Ce’Marie

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Photo Credits (searched through Google)

  • Photo 1: davidbrim.com
  • Photo 2: amlit-kaplan.wikispaces.com
  • Photo 3: laschoolreport.com
  • Photo 4: deeperstory.com
  • Photo 5: pinterest.com
  • Photo 6: dodgeburn.blogspot.com
  • Photo 7: bevelle.wordpress.com